Bernhard schlink s reader

The Reader is a profound exposition of the 'second generation' issues concerning moral guilt for the Holocaust. But it is, I think, also relevant more generally to the way in which human beings get ensnared incrementally into the evils of their society. We are all inevitably involved in this larger problem. And, like the SS guards at a Nazi death camp, we are unaware of the moral peril of our situation, and unwilling to remove ourselves from that situation even when its h What About the Children?

Bernhard schlink s reader

But it is, I think, also relevant more generally to the way in which human beings get ensnared incrementally into the evils of their society. We are all inevitably involved in this larger problem.

And, like the SS guards at a Nazi death camp, we are unaware of the moral peril of our situation, and unwilling to remove ourselves from that situation even when its h What About the Children?

And, like the SS guards at a Nazi death camp, we are unaware of the moral peril of our situation, and unwilling to remove ourselves from that situation even when its harmful effects are obvious. To be more personal and concrete: At the moment I have three acquaintances, each of whom has had a reasonably successful corporate career - one as an investment manager in the City, the second as a senior executive of an international sporting organisation, and the third as a partner of a global accounting firm.

All three are, however, deeply dissatisfied with their lives. Their marriages, they all feel, are on the edge of breakdown. One has had a psychological breakdown and is now institutionalised.

Another has been made redundant and, despite a large payout, sees nothing but existential gloom for the rest of his days.

Young Germans and Israelis don't forget the Holocaust, they go dancing

The last is disgusted with the complete indifference of both his colleagues and clients to the visible harm their firms are inflicting on the world. The reasons given for not stopping were almost identical in all three cases: Guilt in not providing what their families needed was important.

Financial compensation had become just that - compensation for the companionship of marriage and family that had been denied.

This was associated with a fear of the disappointment or disapproval by their friends and family. Success is naturally a social matter defined for us by those we know well. But upon pushing a bit harder, it was also clear that the common strand among them was that each believed he had somehow let himself down by not realising the full potential he believed he had in him.

The Reader - Wikipedia

This psychic driver of "being the best you can" struck loud bells in my own experience. It also reminded me of the remarkable book by Karen Ho, a social researcher from Princeton.

Her ethnographic study of the life and culture of Wall Street, Liquidated, is as insightful as it is troublesome to anyone who asks themselves why indeed they have not simply unlocked the door to an alternative life.

CPE is what stimulates people to work consistently impossible hours, in places distant from home, with no respite.

It also justifies the treatment of subordinates as corporate fodder, hiring and firing with panache, and insisting on single-minded loyalty as one moves up the ranks. Standards of excellence, after all, do not maintain themselves. Escaping that world is no easier than escaping the totalitarian society of Nazi Germany.

Of course CPE is not merely a corporate problem; it is a societal problem. It is a problem of the perceived order. She was afraid, she says, of the disorder that would have ensued: It is this same disorder that my three acquaintances seem to fear most.

The self-identity of the best depends on this. To reject this classification and the criteria that define it, one also must reject the authority that sanctioned it. This authority is so diffuse throughout society, that to reject it means to reject the entire society. The loss of both identity and context for establishing a new identity is the ultimate disorder, chaos.

Jean Korelitz, for example, herself a former admissions officer for Princeton, shows how pervasive the CPE is in the steps before entering the corporate world in her novel, Admission. And it is systematically defended even by those whom it excludes. The effects of CPE extend beyond those who are certifiably, as it were, the best to those who aspire to become part of the elite.

Deficiencies are masked by the aspiration itself, which is merely the acceptance of the defining authority.

Bernhard schlink s reader

Fear of exposure is therefore a powerful motivation to keep the system going, to promote its stable orderliness even when it is so evidently destructive. She may be guilty but not as guilty as she appears, or of what she is charged with.

What duty does he have to unlock the door with which she has imprisoned herself? To speak up, either to her or the court, would expose her to profound shame, greater shame even than that of being found guilty of war crimes perhaps.Bernhard Schlink's novel "The Reader" conquered the literary world 22 years ago.

Rarely had a German author been as successful on the international stage. Bernhard Schlink begins his novel, The Reader, with a scene of the main character.

Michael Berg, a year-old boy, is on his way home from school when he suddenly vomits on the pavement.

Bernhard schlink s reader

Michael Berg, a year-old boy, is on his way home from school when he suddenly vomits on the pavement. The questions, discussion topics and author biography that follow are intended to enhance your group's reading of Bernhard Schlink's The Reader, a haunting story of love and guilt in which the legacy of Nazi crimes enters a young man's life in an unexpected and irrevocable way.

Reader [Bernhard Schlink] on benjaminpohle.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. For year-old Michael Berg, a chance meeting with an older woman leads to far more than he ever imagined.

The woman in question is HannaReviews: Everything you need to know about The Reader by Bernhard Schlink. This website about the novel, The Reader, written by Bernhard Schlink, was published during a project work in a German benjaminpohle.com created summaries on every single chapter, wrote characterizations, built presentations, and collected information on the Holocaust topic during the weeks of our project work.

The Reader (Der Vorleser) is a novel by German law professor and judge Bernhard Schlink, published in Germany in and in the United States in The story is /5.

Bernhard Schlink - Wikipedia